Sunday, June 18, 2017

Latin Quotes Worth Knowing: Nihil tam absurde dici potest quod non dicatur ab aliquo philosophorum.

Nihil tam absurde dici potest quod non dicatur ab aliquo philosophorum.

There is nothing so absurd that it has not been said by some philosopher.

Cicero, De Divinatione 2.58

The grammar literally is, "Nothing can be said so absurdly which is not said by someone of the philosophers."




Learning Latin with Pope Francis - June 18, 2017

To visit my archive of Latin Papal Tweets, go to my main page. 

June 18, 2017



Here's a literal translation of the Latin: Jesus was broken, he is broken for us. The Eucharist is Sacred. He himself in turn wants us to surrender ourselves to others and to break (ourselves for others).

And here's how the grammar of this Latin tweet works:


Latin
English
Parsing
Grammar Points
Iesus
Jesus
nom. sing. masc. name
Iesus, Iesu
fractus
broken
nom. sing. past. part.
frangō, frangere, frēgī, frāctus
est
was [is]
3rd pers. sing. pres. ind. verb
sum, esse, fui; used with past part. to create passive of perf. tense.
nobis
for us
dat. pl. pronoun
nos, nostri
frangitur
he is broken
3rd pers. sing. pres. pass. ind. verb
frangō, frangere, frēgī, frāctus
Sacra
Sacred
nom. sing. fem. adj.
sacer, sacra, sacrum
est
is
3rd pers. sing. pres. ind. verb
sum, esse, fui
Eucharistia
the Eucharist
nom. sing. fem. noun
Eucharistia, Eucharistiae
Ipse
He himself
nom. sing. masc. dem. adj.
ipse, ipsa, ipsum
vicissim
in turn
adv.
vult
wants
3rd pers. sing. pres. ind. verb
volo, velle, volui
ut
that
conj.
nos
ourselves
acc. pl. pronoun
nos, nostri
aliis
to others
dat. pl. adj.
alius, alia, aliud
tradamus
we surrender
1st pers. pl. pres. act. subj. verb
trādō, trādere, trādidī, trāditus
ac
and also
conj.
frangamus
we break
1st pers. pl. pres. act. subj. verb
frangō, frangere, frēgī, frāctus

The Time I Won a Thousand Dollar Prize in a Paper Airplane Contest!

Here's the video story of my win and a step-by-step explanation of how to make that superior paper airplane!


Saturday, June 17, 2017

Learning Latin with Pope Francis - June 17, 2017

To visit my archive of Latin Papal Tweets, go to my main page. 

June 17, 2017


Here's a literal translation of the Latin: Ecological concern is always also social concern. Let us run to the aid of the Earth and also the poor (who are) calling out.

And here's how the grammar of this Latin tweet works:


Latin
English
Parsing
Grammar Points
Oecologica
Ecological
nom. sing. fem. adj.
oecologicus, oecologica, oecologicum
sollicitudo
concern
nom. sing. fem. noun
sollicitudo, sollicitudinis
semper
always
adv.
est
is
3rd pers. sing. pres. ind. verb
sum, esse, fui
quoque
also
adv.
socialis
social
nom. sing. fem. adj.
socialis, sociale
sollicitudo
concern
nom. sing. fem. noun
sollicitudo, sollicitudinis
Terrae
the Earth
dat. sing. fem. noun
terra, terrae
et
and
conj.
pauperibus
the poor
dat. pl. masc. noun
pauper, pauperis
quoque
also
adv.
clamantibus
calling out
dat. pl. pres. act. part.
clamo, clamare, clamavi, clamatus
occurramus
let us run to the aid of
occurrō, occurrere, occurrī, occursus

Change for the Better: A Year in the Life of a Teacher on Hall Duty

I teach Latin at a public high school in New Jersey. This year, two of my three duty periods were to walk the halls after lunch, and the third was to monitor the overflow cafeteria in the library.

And early on I was picking up random coins kids would drop and apparently not want to pick up.

I asked students why they didn't themselves pick up, say, a dime they saw sitting on the ground. Most stated that they would bother picking up a quarter, but anything smaller wasn't worth the time.

On one occasion a student was getting up from a table on which there clearly sat a dime and a penny. I said, "Aren't you going to take that change?"

He said, "Why? What can eleven cents buy you anymore?"

[As if he remembers a time long ago when it could!]


The Dream: Eating McDonald's on "Found Money"

I began picking up the coins I would see and put them in an envelope in the desk of a colleague who shares my love of McDonald's. We joked that maybe, just maybe, the change could add up to enough by the end of the year to get our beloved Big Macs only on "found money."

As the school year wound down, my last hall duty of the year happened before we have now started Final Exams.

It was time for the grand total.

We had been counting as we went, keeping track of it on the envelope, and putting pennies in another envelope altogether. Here's the final tally:



$22.90! And that's not counting the pennies, which probably totaled another three dollars.

On Thursday we went to McDonald's, and our order, each of us getting a Big Mac, Large Fries, and 4 Piece Chicken McNuggets, came to about that much. We took all the pennies and the nickles and put them in the Ronald McDonald House Charities receptacle. We had separated the quarters and dimes into dollars to use them without inconvenience. And so it happened, we did indeed have two people eat McDonald's mostly on "found money."


"Kids These Days"

A final point. You may notice there is a five dollar bill in that picture. One day when I was on the library duty, I noticed something under the chair of a student working at one of the public computers. As I picked it up, I realized it was a five dollar bill, looking like it had been trampled under foot there for days, not hours. There were about five students working in the immediate vicinity at those computers. 

I said aloud, "Whose five dollar bill is this?"

Some kids checked their pockets and purses and one by one answered, "It's not mine."

I said, "If any one of you says this is your five dollar bill, I'm giving it to you."

And each one said in turn words to the effect of, "It's not mine, so that would be lying."

Keep in mind, this is not a rich school, it's not like five dollars means nothing to those kids. But what clearly matters more to them is their honesty and integrity.

And so, I have to say, anyone who thinks the world is going downhill because of "Kids These Days," simply doesn't spend enough time with young people. 



Friday, June 16, 2017

Learning Latin with Pope Francis - June 16, 2017

To visit my archive of Latin Papal Tweets, go to my main page. 

June 16, 2017



Here's a literal translation of the Latin: Love professes that we act in truth and ingeniously. Good intentions are not enough. People are not numbers, but brothers (who) must be cared for.

And here's how the grammar of this Latin tweet works:


Latin
English
Parsing
Grammar Points
Prae
before

Prep.+Abl.
se
itself
abl. sing. refl. pronoun
se, sui
fert
brings
3rd pers. sing. pres. act. ind. verb
fero, ferre, tuli, latus; the idiom prae se ferre means “manifests, shows, professes.”
amor
love
nom. sing. masc. noun
amor, amoris
ut
that

conj.
re
in truth
abl. adverb
res, rei
ingenioseque
and ingeniously

adv; enclitic conj.
agamus
we act
1st pers. pl. pres. act. subj. verb
ago, agere, egi, actus
Bona
Good
nom. pl. neut. adj.
bonus, bona, bonum
proposita
intentions
nom. pl. neut. noun
propositum, propositi
non
not

adv.
sufficiunt
are enough
3rd pers. pl. pres. act. ind. verb
sufficiō, sufficere, suffēcī, suffectus
Homines
People
nom. pl. com. noun
homo, hominis
non
not

adv.
sunt
are
3rd pers. pl. pres. ind. verb
sum, esse, fui
numeri
numbers
nom. pl. masc. noun
numerus, numeri
sed
but

conj.
fratres
brothers
nom. pl. masc. noun
frater, fratris
curandi
(who) must be cared for
nom. pl. masc. gerundive
curo, curare, curavi, curatus
 

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